The Sean Taylor Flawless Cut Has Been Pulled

We’re roughly 24 hours into the release of Panini’s 2017 Flawless NFL Football and one of the most anticipated cards has already been pulled by a collector in Ohio.

Keaton Icard pulled the Sean Taylor Flawless Cuts numbered 1/1 yesterday from Triple Play Sports Cards & Memorabilia in Westerville, Ohio.

Pictures of the card were posted in a Facebook group Wednesday evening and offers for this cut autograph quickly surpassed a couple thousand dollars, which isn’t shocking since this is his first and only certified pack-released autograph. Autographs of Taylor on items such as mini helmets and 8×10 photos consistently sell for over $600 when accompanied by a reputable third-party authentication such as PSA.

While I applaud Panini for producing Taylor’s first autograph card and including it in a high-end release like Flawless, the finished product leaves something to be desired. The actual cut is half of a 2004 Topps Total Sean Taylor rookie card that must’ve been signed in-person which Panini acquired then authenticated before deciding to include it in this release. It’s ironic that Panini used a Topps card for this but that’s fine with me. The part that bothers me is the excess room on each side of the cut since it doesn’t fill up the entire window. I would’ve rather seen them use a cut from an autographed photo to ensure there was no excess for the finished product. However, all gripes aside, this is truly a unique, one-of-kind card that will be highly sought after. Just don’t be surprised if you never see it again after the eBay listing is complete. I can easily see this going into someone’s collection never to see the light of day again.

If you’re interested in purchasing this card, you can find it on eBay here! Keaton has it posted for sale in a 10-day listing. He also has plans to start a break page very soon so keep your eyes open for that in the very near future, too!

It’ll be interesting to see what the final price of this Sean Taylor card is with some predicting it will surpass $10,000. I guess we’ll know in 10 days!

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When a Gem Isn’t Actually Pristine

Earlier today, Blowout Buzz posted an article about a 1968 Topps Nolan Ryan / Jerry Koosman on eBay. However, this wasn’t any ol’ 1968 Topps rookie card that someone found at a yard sale and posted for sale. This one was listed at over $1 million and has been given the grade of 98 (on a 1-100 scale) by SGC. In other words, they graded it as gem mint and as a comparison, an SGC 98 would crossover to BGS as a 9.5 and to PSA as a 10.

This is indeed a rare card!

Based on what you can see in the picture above, the front of the card does indeed look like a card that could grade very high. The centering looks even. The corners seem sharp. It’s a very attractive card.

The issue I have is with the back of the card. It is clearly not a centered card. Being that it’s centered 30/70 at best on the back, why would SGC grade this card as a 98 gem mint? It’s anyone’s guess why it earned the grade it did but there has always been a rumor surrounding the grading of vintage cards by companies such as SGC, BGS (or BVG), and PSA. That rumor is that the fronts of vintage cards weigh more heavily in the overall grade especially if the front has substantial eye-catching appeal.

As is the case with the card pictured, the front is fantastic and while the back is somewhat off-centered, it supposedly doesn’t detract enough from the overall appeal of the card to lower the grade.

In my opinion, I’ve always hated when grading companies do this. A card graded as gem mint or pristine should be exactly that. It shouldn’t look “pretty good” and given a higher grade than it deserves because the card is desirable and eye-catching, especially if someone is going to list it at $1.2 million! Each grade should be treated equally and the back should count towards the grade as much as the front does.

What do you think? Let me know in the comments section or tag me @jasondeanmartin on Twitter.

Artemi Panarin Mailday

I’m not really adding modern cards anymore, but I will make some exceptions for WVU and Blackhawks cards.  The only Artemi Panarin I had was one of the Parkhurst cards, so when Sammy had this one, I picked it up.  He is one of the good guys in the hobby and when he wants to move something, he prices it right.

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2015-16 Upper Deck – O-Pee-Chee Update Retro #U45 Artemi Panarin

If you have any interest in contributing, I’d love to have more content for readers!  If you like what we’re doing and want updates when we post new pieces, follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Please take the time and also look through some other pieces on the site.  I’m still looking for more folks that would like to contribute, so let me know if you are!  You can follow me on my other Twitter handles at @kin_kinsley and @DFW_Card_Shows.

Can Inserts Legitimately Be Considered Rookie Cards?

I ask this question because I feel that the case I’m bringing to your attention is indeed special and unique. And if you’ve been around this hobby for any length of time, it’s rare to find a truly unique topic of conversation that hasn’t been rehashed over and over. 

Before I really dive into this topic, I’d like to provide you with a little background on my history with the player involved. 

His name? Pat McAfee, punter/kicker/comedian for the Indianapolis Colts. 

If you follow the NFL at all outside of just the games being played, you may have already heard that McAfee is one of the most entertaining personalities on and off the field. 

Pat McAfee Uncaged (NSFW)
My “following” of McAfee goes back to his college days at West Virginia University when I worked for Hat World/Lids in Morgantown, WV and some of my regular customers were WVU athletes, not to mention one of the other employees was a student and friends with half of them, including Pat. Ever since then I’ve kind of kept my eye on McAfee’s place in the hobby. 

But, that was a problem in itself. Even though he was drafted in 2009, his first trading card was not released until 2014 by Topps. That means no Press Pass cards, no SA-GE, no Upper Deck. Nothing for five years!

Then in 2014, Topps produced the first ever Pat McAfee trading card. 


It’s a 2014 Topps All-Pro Team Commemorative Helmet card /99. 

Upon learning of his first card, I was ecstatic. I remember waiting for one to pop up on each Bay so I could buy it. Much to my surprise, the prices on these things went insane! I know the print run was limited to 99 but this card was selling and continues to sell for $100 or more. 

His next card produced was in the basic Topps 2015 set and is consistently sold for $1 with parallels pulling in strong sales on a consistent basis. 


According to Beckett, at the time of this writing, neither card is listed as his rookie card. Although, during my research (thank you @pisano64) of the situation, I was contacted by Ryan Cracknell, Editor at Beckett, about the issue and he’s looking into it. Let’s not forget that Topps also didn’t tag either card with the NFL rookie card logo either. 

All of that has led me to this question: which card should be considered McAfee’s rookie card?

In my opinion, it’s the 2015 Topps because it wasn’t produced on a limited basis like the 2014 card was. But, I can also agree with anyone that would argue that the 2014 card should be considered his rookie card because it was his first card. 

For now, I want to know what collectors think. Send me a Twitter reply or you can comment below. 

Happy collecting!

Mail day! An Alternative Eddie Murray PSA RC

Here’s another addition to my PSA rookie card collection! It’s somewhat of an alternative to the traditional Eddie Murray Topps 1978 rookie card and it’s definitely cheaper!

  
I was able to add this PSA 8 1978 Eddie Murray Kellogg’s #25 to my stash for less than $15 delivered. 

This will go great with the PSA 5 1972 Carlton Fisk Topps rookie card and the PSA 10 2015 Carlos Correa Topps Heritage rookie I recently purchased. 

I have one more PSA-graded rookie card en route to my mailbox that I purchased on eBay for $4.99 delivered. Who could it be? Here’s a clue. He is affectionately known by some as “Uncle Ray!”

Stay tuned! That card will be revealed soon!

Vintage Football Card of the Day – 1981 Topps #422 Dwight Clark Rookie

I have a difficult time calling a card from 1981 “vintage,” but it’s over 25 years old.  He made one of the most famous catches in NFL history and it’s his 59th birthday, so I guess it qualifies.

dwight clark
1981 Topps #422 Dwight Clark

If you like what we’re doing and want updates when we post new pieces, follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Please take the time and also look through some other pieces on the site.  I’m still looking for more folks that would like to contribute, so let me know if you are!  You can follow me on my other Twitter handles at @kin_kinsley and @DFW_Card_Shows.

 

Vintage Football of the Day – 1953 Bowman #1 Eddie LeBaron

I don’t know how many times it’s happened, but Ken Griffey Jr. wasn’t the first athlete to have his rookie card be #1 in a set.  Eddie LeBaron’s first mainstream card saw him pictured on card number one.

eddie lebaron
1953 Bowman #1 Eddie LeBaron

LeBaron passed away last year, but today would have been his 86th birthday.  He played 11 NFL seasons with the Redskins and Cowboys.  I’ll give you a nickel if you can tell me where he played college football without looking.  If you tell me that you said “Pacific,” I might call you a liar!

If you like what we’re doing and want updates when we post new pieces, follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Please take the time and also look through some other pieces on the site.  I’m still looking for more folks that would like to contribute, so let me know if you are!  You can follow me on my other Twitter handles at @kin_kinsley and @DFW_Card_Shows.